Monday, October 6, 2014

What Are the Kids Doing?

Today's college student blog is "An Exciting Day."

[+]

The Flava.
I've had my cucumber;
I'm ready for anything.
The beginning of each day is SO crucial to how your mood throughout the day will be. When you have structure in your mornings, you’re way more likely to be in a positive state of mind during the day. The key here is to develop a routine that excites you.
Something that makes you look forward to going to bed, so that you can wake up and eagerly get started on the next day.
I’ll explain my current routine, and then will break it down in terms of what positive results I get from each part.
My Routine
7:00am – Wake up and put in contacts
7:05 – Contrast shower (Hot for washing, then blast cold water after)
7:20 – Listen to a podcast/audiobook while getting dressed and brewing my bulletproof coffee
7:50 - Cook breakfast (3 eggs + egg whites scrambled, turkey bacon and 1/4 of a cucumber)
The Rest.

15 comments:

  1. I'm torn about this kid. I've read some of the other inanities, but I was quite inane at 18 as well.

    Still, at least he seems to be trying. That youthful whatever will get beat out of him. It's only October.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What about this is inane?

      Delete
    2. Hi Anon, thanks for the comment. There's usually an option to enter your comment using NAME/URL. (It's under REPLY AS.) It helps the community to know who we're talking to. Enjoy!

      Delete
  2. It's actually pretty good advice, at its core: find something to look forward to each morning. But . . . What is biohacking and how is that one of his hobbies? Sounds terrifying.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Biohacking to me is simply experimenting with eating/sleeping/supplements/exercise/etc. in order to reach my optimum performance as a human being.

      I consider it a hobby as I'm always experimenting with eating the best foods, sleeping in better ways, taking proper vitamins - all for the purpose of increasing energy, health and vitality.

      Delete
  3. Here's a TED talk on biohacking: http://www.ted.com/talks/ellen_jorgensen_biohacking_you_can_do_it_too

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm not sure whether having a TED talk about it makes me feel better or worse about the prospect. I'm old school. Hacking is something one does with a machete.

      Delete
  4. I'm not sure I'd say "inane," but there is an endearing innocence behind the whole thing. I actually really kind of like him. I mean, how can you not like someone who suggests, in all earnestness, that you listen to music, because it'll make you happy. Or that you should doodle pictures in your notes to help you remember stuff. Or that we should put pictures of people who motivate us on the wall. It's all quite adorable. There's some good stuff, too, such as his suggestion that we meditate daily. Totally with him there, in theory if not in practice. But I will be a monkey's uncle before I put butter in my goddamned coffee, toxins be damned.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I know it's a small detail, but why the 1/4 cucumber? Of all foods to restrict, cucumber, which must be 90% water, hardly seems like the one to choose. Is this extreme carbo-phobia? Then again, I went on some fairly nutty diets at the same age, so, like others, I'm inclined to conclude that I'm in no position to throw stones.

    As for the hot-and-cold shower, in my undergrad dorm those came free, with no effort on my part, every time someone on the same plumbing stack flushed a toilet. I'd never do it deliberately, but I have to admit it does wake you up.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey,

      Cucumbers are extremely cheap, and they're a great source of healthy vegetables. It's a simple way for me to add some greens into my breakfasts. I only eat a quarter each morning so that 2 cucumbers can last me a week.

      Delete
    2. Oh, that makes sense. I was wondering about the cucumber, too. It seemed so random. :) They're not cheap where I live, but I sure like them.

      Delete
    3. Okay, now I really want to try Bulletproof coffee! Only I will not be buying Bulletproof beans. And I'm not sure where I will get grass-fed butter in Canada. Nor am I sure where to get the coconut oil extract. But I have tried butter in coffee before - when I had run out of cream - and it's pretty good. Thank you for passing on the recipe, Lucas.

      Delete
    4. Aha! That makes sense. Depending on where you are (and whether local denizens insist on pouring poison all over anything that isn't grass), you might try dandelion greens, or purslane -- both highly nutritious, and free for the scavenging. Parsley's a pretty good source of concentrated nutrients, too, and will live for some time in a glass of water (or, with roots, in a pot on the windowsill).

      Delete
    5. To Merely Academic,

      Where in Canada are you looking? I know a place in Waterloo, a few places in Vaughan. There are definitely others in Ontario. Or you can order KerryGold Butter from the US.

      Delete