Saturday, October 15, 2016

"Dr. Gibson - No more using that big stick :) It needs batteries." Annie finds comedy gold in the Reddit hinterlands.

So since the start of my CS class, my teacher had always complained about not having a laser pointer. Instead, she had to use a heavy-ish meter stick, because the board was about 8 ft off the ground. So I thought, hey, wouldn't it be nice of me to buy her a laser pointer. Boy was I wrong.



  1. Is it wrong that I read the italicized passage then the title, and the first thing I thought of as a misinterpretation of "big stick, needs batteries" is "cattle prod"?

    1. I'm not sure. I have to admit that I'm not really up to date with stick-shaped battery-operated technology/ies in general (though I did guess the joke before clicking through).

      One of my classrooms had a wireless mouse that I think could also change ppt slides for a while, but (a) it had a charging cradle and was usually dead because nobody remembered to put it back and (b) I don't use powerpoint (and trying to click between screens in an LMS, library databases, etc., while viewing a screen from the side and holding a mouse in the middle of the air doesn't really work). So somebody installed a wired mouse, and I'm back to using that, and perfectly happy to be so.

      A cattle prod does sound like it might come in handy as a dual-purpose classroom object (point or keep order as necessary), but with the overuse of "order-keeping" instruments, including tasers, on K-12 campuses, and the school to prison pipeline, and the general fetishization of "compliance" in/by so many U.S. institutions, suggesting that, even in jest, just doesn't feel right these days. It really kills the joke when people actually do stuff (or a very close equivalent thereto) that we would suggest only as hyperbole.

    2. Yeah, you're right. It really kills the joke.

    3. And it also occurs to me that at some point in my life, some kinds of "locker room talk" were rendered off-limits, among other reasons, by the knowledge that people had actually done that stuff.

      I think Frod's stapler remains safe to joke about, at least for a while.